Resurrection Juice

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Natural Farming inputs are all about giving plants what you want them to do. You don’t need to know anything about the biochemistry to figure out effective inputs. It’s all about the patterns in nature. Using the power of patterns is how I found Resurrection Juice.

People often ask if using so-and-so plant is good for making a fermented juice. It depends on what you want to use it for. What is the plant good at?

For example I had a miracle berry bush that grew tight, with short nodes*. It didn’t get air or light in the center of the bush and didn’t produce berries. I needed it to open up, to have longer nodes. As a scientist I know gibberellic acid is a plant hormone that will give longer nodes. It’s used on grapes because if the cluster of grapes is too tight they mold. But I didn’t go out and buy gibberellic acid, and I didn’t look up which plants have it.

As a Natural Farmer I looked to the pattern and found a plant with really long nodes, made a fermented juice from that, and gave it to my miracle berry bush. And like a miracle it started growing longer nodes, opened up, and from then on produced berries prolifically. In this case a single application was all that was needed.

Years later we were cutting down koa haole trees (Leucaena leucocephala). But of course they want to grow back. When I saw the shoots growing out of the cut trunks, I saw a pattern. The tree was trying to resurrect itself. As resurrection could be a useful tool I made a fermented juice from the soft growing tips of the koa haole re-growth, collected before sunrise so that the growth factors would still be active.

Resurrection Juice is now a permanent part of my system. I use it for plants that need to be brought back to life or are trying to come out of dormancy. I find it highly effective.

What is the pattern of koa haole that makes it good for Resurrection Juice? It’s a fast growing weedy tree, a pioneer species, and it will vigorously regrow from its roots if cut to the ground. It’s a legume, a type of mimosa. The part that is used for this purpose is the young soft tips of the shoots that spring from a cut trunk or root, again, collected before sunrise so that the growth factors are active.

So what plants do you have that show a talent for something useful? Look for patterns and give it a try.

*the part of a plant stem from which one or more leaves emerge, often forming a slight swelling

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